Monthly Archives: January 2023

Why I enjoy hanging out with entrepreneurs

I’ve been a regular attendee at the Indie Hackers Berlin meetup lately. I’m not particularly an entrepreneur myself, but I love hanging out with them because they generally have many of the following qualities:

  • High functioning
  • Smart/Clever (to be successfull, you kind of have to be)
  • Ambitious
  • Creative
  • Unconventional thinkers
  • Into self development
  • Leadership

All of which make them very fun and interesting to be around!

Why I write in public

Note to self. I write because:

  • Improved clarity of thought
  • Archive of thought
  • Improves writing skills

In addition, I write in public because:

  • It reinforces a mindset of speaking my mind in public (i.e. courage)
  • Receive valuable feedback and external perspectives
  • Build relationships

Furthermore, I’ve found that it’s addicting to write in public.

  • It feels good to look back on writing and realize you’ve expressed yourself clear and well. And that you understand the topic well know.
  • It feels good to develop a voice.
  • It feels good to watch yourself improve. You can write better, faster with practice.
  • You become more self-observant of your thoughts, and realize that there are so many interesting things to write about.
  • It feels good to get positive feedback on your writing.

Can we have non-atomic std::shared_ptr in C++?

Turns out, we do have them. libstdc++ contains a heuristic kludge where it checks if libpthread is linked into the process and conditionally executes an atomic add or non-atomic add depending on the result. Post 2020, it doesn’t directly use the libpthread hack, but uses glibc’s native support for this.

These kinds of things always make me sad about C++ (especially compared to how nice and clean things seem to be in Rust world), but at least it’s nice knowing that the committee did consider it and there are good reasons why to not have this in the C++ stdlib. The most compelling reason is that in the absence of a borrow checker, it is all too easy to silently use a non-atomic shared_ptr in multithreaded code.

Full thread: